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THEEMERSONCENTER.ORG:              

The Florida Humanities Series is our gift to the community.
 

In 2007, The Florida Humanities Council an independent, non-profit organization that serves as our state's affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, funded a special program at The Emerson Center to provide free, public programs that explore Florida's history, folklore, environment, literature, music, and art. Today, relying solely on community support, The Emerson Center continues to offer these informative programs for our neighbors.


Now, you can download an informative flier describing the 2013-2014 Florida Humanities Series.


Join us in saying special thanks to Marine Bank & Trust, our sponsor for the 2013-2014 Florida Humanities Series.


The capacity of the Emerson Center is more than 800. For our Florida Humanities series, free admission will be offered on a first-come-first-served basis. There will be a selection of V.I.P. seats reserved for season ticket holders of the "Celebrated Speakers Series," Florida Humanities Series Sponsors, and Friends of the Emerson Center. The Emerson Center is handicapped-accessible and is conveniently located at 1590 27th Avenue, on the SE corner of 16th Street and 27th Avenue in Vero Beach. For more information, contact 778-5249.
 

Once again in 2013-2014, The Emerson Center at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship in Vero Beach will present the Florida Humanities Series - our gift to the community. Six acclaimed speakers will be presented at the Center between October 2013 and April 2014, with all presentations relating to Florida history, nature, culture, and issues. Admission to each is complimentary and all performances will begin at 7 p.m.
 

Coming up next on the Florida Humanities Series stage...



STAND BY!!!
IN A FEW WEEKS, WE WILL UNVEIL OUR EXCITING HUMANITIES SCHEDULE FOR THE 2014-2015 SERIES. MEANWHILE, ENJOY REVIEWING PRIOR PROGRAMS FROM
THE 2013-2014 HUMANITIES SERIES.

 


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October 24, 2013, 7pm
Susan Fernandez, Ph.D.
Sunshine in the Dark:
Florida in the Movies

 

Florida is a beautiful state with many interesting stories about its people and its beginnings. Movies have been made in Florida and have been made about Florida. Dr. Fernandez, Associate Professor of History at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, will use video screening and slides to tell us how Florida has been portrayed in film and how those images have shaped people’s ideas of the state.
 

"Sunshine in the Dark: Florida in the Movies” is also the title of Dr. Fernandez' acclaimed book published by the University Press of Florida. In this book (and her video presentation), she recounts the films while examining location settings, plotlines, and characters. She delves into the Florida stereotypes which have been portrayed by the leading characters — from the struggling crackers in The Yearling (1946) to the drug-addicted man in Adaptation (2002).
 

General admission seating is available FREE of charge for this performance thanks to the generous support of the Florida Humanities Council and our sponsor, Marine Bank & Trust.

 


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December 5, 2013, 7pm
Dale Crider
Sing for Wild Things

 

Florida's environmental troubadour Crider has written, recorded and performed numerous songs about Florida, its unique wilderness and wildlife, bringing attention to the plight of endangered wildlife, and to the natural systems that support all life in Florida. He recently retired after 30 years as a waterfowl biologist, environmental and educational specialist. He has performed in most states and many other countries.
 

Holiday refreshments will be served following the presentation.
 

General admission seating is available FREE of charge for this performance thanks to the generous support of the Florida Humanities Council and our sponsor, Marine Bank & Trust.


 

 


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January 23, 2014, 7pm
Rody Johnson
World War II U-Boat Attack Off Vero Beach

 

During the early days of World War II, German U-boats crept along the U.S. East Coast off of Vero Beach. As a child, Johnson heard whispers about them as his father, Kit Johnson, a Coast Guard Auxiliary volunteer, patrolled the coastline in his small fishing craft to search for and rescue the survivors of ships torpedoed by the Germans. Rody Johnson has written a touching remembrance to his father. Johnson worked in aerospace systems management for most of his career and published three Florida community newspapers.
 

General admission seating is available FREE of charge for this performance thanks to the generous support of the Florida Humanities Council and our sponsor, Marine Bank & Trust.


 

 


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February 13, 2014, 7pm
Van Samuels
Unconquered Seminole People and Their Traditions

 

On February 13 at 7:00 PM, Van Samuels from the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki museum will speak at The Emerson Center on “The Unconquered Seminole People and their Traditions.”

The Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Seminole Indian Museum (affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution) is nestled in the heart of the Everglades on the Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation, and is home to more than 30,000 unique artifacts, archival items and experiences. Here, one can learn about the Seminole people and their rich cultural and historical ties to the Southeast and Florida, as they have made Big Cypress their home for more thousands of years.

Samuels' work in the Museum field began eight years ago as a Tour Guide, but his increased interest in Native American history and culture began at an early age. Born and raised in his native community in the State of Oklahoma, Van is of Choctaw tribal descent.

The combination of his Native American heritage, knowledge from the cultural teachings of his elders and his educational background have become key elements in the formation of his vocation. Additionally, having worked in the tour guide capacity for the Unconquered Seminole Tribe of Florida museum, and having been previously certified by the National Association for Interpretation as a Certified Interpretive Guide has proven to be a useful component for the Outreach position he is in today.

Van has a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice/Paralegal studies from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma and a minor degree in Business. Prior to that he was enrolled in the Oklahoma City University School of Business and the School of Art. He also had the privilege of spending a summer in Washington, D.C. employed as a government intern on Capitol Hill.

His fascination with Native American history is the driving force behind the increased knowledge he continues to gain regarding Native American people in general. He is also an accomplished musician and has performed at numerous venues across the United States.

General admission seating is available FREE of charge for this performance thanks to the generous support of the Florida Humanities Council and our sponsor, Marine Bank & Trust.

 

 


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March 6, 2014, 7pm
Janie Gould
Sea Cows, Seaweed and Spanish Moss: How Floridians Coped When Times Were Hard
 

 

Sea cows now are more commonly known as manatees and are a protected species, just as the city we call home was once wetlands and would never have come into existence under today’s regulations.
 

Gould is a journalist and public radio personality who is known throughout the state for her award-winning Floridays, oral histories about early Florida. She has recorded interviews with more than 250 people, about everything from manatee hunting to frog giggling in rural Florida. In addition to Floridays, Gould has produced many radio programs and documentaries for WQCS Radio, retired from there recently. She has earned awards for her work from the state and from the Associated Press. She also writes book reviews and features for Indian River Magazine in her spare time.
 

Gould is a fifth generation Floridian and a University of Florida journalism graduate.
 

General admission seating is available FREE of charge for this performance thanks to the generous support of the Florida Humanities Council and our sponsor, Marine Bank & Trust.

 

 


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April 3, 2014, 7pm
Carl Halbirt
St. Augustine’s Unseen Heritage: The Archeaology of Early Colonial Life in America's Oldest European
Community

 

St. Augustine’s archaeological heritage is  unparalleled in the quantity and diversity of remains buried beneath its buildings,  streets.and backyards. Halbirt has been the city archaeologist since 1990, conducting archaeological investigations at properties slated for development, and conserving artifacts collected, both European and Native American.
 

General admission seating is available FREE of charge for this performance thanks to the generous support of the Florida Humanities Council and our sponsor, Marine Bank & Trust.

 

 


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May 28, 2014, 7pm
Dreamers & Schemers
Legendary Floridians "come alive" on our stage.

 

The Florida Humanities Council, partnering with the Emerson Center and supported by Marine Bank and Trust, is presenting a portrayal of three historic Floridians in a new “Dreamers & Schemers” production, the second show in this series to appear on our stage in the 2013 - 2014 season. A “D&S” program staged at Emerson in November garnered numerous audience requests for more of these Chautauqua-style historic portrayals.

The May presentation will feature a troupe of three professional actors who will portray author Zora Neale Hurston, governor Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, and conquistador Pedro Menéndez de Aviles, depicting who they were and how they impacted the state.

Newly celebrated Hurston – folklorist, anthropologist, pioneer of the Harlem Renaissance – will be played by Phyllis McEwen. Chad Mena will perform the role of Menéndez de Aviles, prominent Spanish admiral and founder of St. Augustine, with Jack Holloway again portraying sheriff/congressman/governor Broward.

The Humanities Council has conducted this series of statewide programs called “Dreamers & Schemers” in connection with the 500th anniversary of the landing in Florida of Ponce de Léon. The programs are designed to engage the audience in thoughtful reflection and dialogue about our state's rich history.
 

General admission seating is available FREE of charge for this performance thanks to the generous support of the Florida Humanities Council and our sponsor, Marine Bank & Trust.

 

 


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